Sermons

The Crossing | Be The Church

The Crossing | Be The Church

  • January 01

    Trust

    Acts 2:36-41
    David Woods

    The church is formed by faith in Jesus. In Acts 2:41 the church is described as “those who believed what Peter said.” A group of people, but a very unique group of people--formed by faith in Jesus that is informed by the Gospel. Peter preaches the first Gospel message and a group of people respond to it by repenting and being baptized. This forms the church. Save yourselves from the crooked generation (who has rejected the Messiah) by believing the truth about Jesus. The Gospel message prompts a personal decision of faith and forms a community of believers. 

  • January 08

    Submit

    Acts 2:42
    Danny Curry

    We are the church when we submit to the authority of God’s truth. What did the apostles teach? What were the things in the early church that had such great meaning? Primarily it would have been the oral tradition surrounding the life and teaching of Jesus and how the resurrection culminated and animated that teaching as Jesus gave the Holy Spirit and ascended to Heaven. It can safely be assumed that the teachings of the Apostles would have been centered around the gospels. In this sermon we address what the Gospel teaches us and requires of us as the gathered and sent people of God.

  • January 15

    Care

    Acts 2:42
    Danny Curry

    We are the church when we care enough to help each other. In first century Judaism fellowship meant something more than hanging out and watching sports. We often speak of fellowship simply in terms of a “get together” - but how do we align our lives, our circles, our beings to incorporate more of what fellowship was to the new testament writers into our modern, fast-paced, way-too-cram-packed, 21st century, Facebook-addicted, constantly connected lives?

  • January 22

    Belong

    Acts 2:42
    Danny Curry

    We are the church when we invite each other into authentic friendship. What if the church really was a safe place where you could be vulnerable, take off your mask, and bare your true self. Eating together was a big deal in the Old Testament. What was the significance of this act in the Jewish culture? Why did it matter so much? We live in this tension where we eat lots of meals that are as fast as possible to get from one thing to another. In our context, how can we value eating together as a spiritual act. We do this together each week, but it shouldn’t be the only time we share a meal. Who are you inviting to your table?

  • January 29

    Depend

    Acts 2:42
    Danny Curry

    We are the church when we look to God for everything we need. In Acts, we see the church fervently praying. We see them not gathering together in the absence of gospel infused, Spirit-filled action in the world - rather, we see their gathering and praying as a part of the usual, normal, expected way of living. Today, prayer seems to be more regulated to certain and specific times of individual devotion, as a transitory act in a worship service, or as a special, set-off-to-the-side event that churches sponsor. The early church prayed, seemingly, because they didn’t see any other way to get along in the world. But they specifically prayed when they gathered, not just as they went. Most circles I’ve been in tack prayer on to the end of the meeting, as the kids are released, and primarily pray about “requests” offered by the group. What would it look like for us to desire praying together as much as we desire talking about last week’s sermon?